Kamchatka Peninsula the great place for Eco-Tourism

The Kamchatka Peninsula (Russian: полуо́стров Камча́тка, poluostrov Kamchatka) is a 1,250-kilometre (780 mi) peninsula in the Russian Far East, with an area of about 270,000 km2 (100,000 sq mi).[1] It lies between the Pacific Ocean to the east and the Sea of Okhotsk to the west.[2] Immediately offshore along the Pacific coast of the peninsula runs the 10,500-metre (34,400 ft) deep Kuril-Kamchatka Trench.

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Alongside the some 400,000 people who live there are various types of wildlife. Because the climate of the Kamchatka Peninsula ranges a lot in temperature, the small number of people who live there and the fact that the region remains relatively undeveloped, the wildlife is known to be quite diverse. Even so, there is commercial exploitation of the waters surrounding the region and fur trapping in Russia, which has strained some of the marine and land animals.

Politically, the peninsula is part of Kamchatka Krai. The southern tip is called Cape Lopatka. The circular bay to the north of this on the Pacific side is Avacha Bay with the capital, Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky. North up the Pacific side, the four peninsulas are called Shipunsky Point, Kronotsky Point, Kamchatsky Point and Ozernoy Point. North of Ozernoy is the large Karaginsky Bay and island. Northeast of this off the map is Korfa Bay with the town of Tilichiki. On the opposite side is the Shelikhov Gulf.

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Go take a trip to Krasnaya Polyana, also known as the Red Valley. You’ll have loads of fun skiing down 25km of snow, as with every other skier and snowboarder in the country. If you’re looking for an adrenaline rush, go heli-skiing over at the Kamchatka Peninsula!

Kamchatka boasts diverse and abundant wildlife. This is due to climates ranging from temperate to subarctic, diverse topography and geography, many free-flowing rivers, proximity to highly productive waters from the northwestern Pacific Ocean and the Bering and Okhotsk Seas, and to the low human density and minimal development. It also boasts the southernmost expanse of Arctic tundra in the world. Commercial exploitation of marine resources and a history of fur trapping has taken its toll on several species.
A German-born naturalist, zoologist, explorer, and physician, Georg Wilhelm Steller explored much of the coast of Alaska and eastern Russia. During expeditions to the Kamchatka Peninsula and the Bering Sea, Steller lent his name to the Steller’s Jay, Steller’s Eider, and Steller’s Sea-Eagle. He also named several marine mammals, including the extinct Steller’s Sea Cow, a slow-moving behemoth whose limited range proved to be the source of its demise, and the Steller’s Sea Lion, a regal pinniped whose population decline is mimicking that of its similarly-named cousin.
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Eco-tourism

With an annual growth rate of 20-34%, eco-tourism is one of the fastest growing niche travel markets today. The International Ecotourism Spociety defines eco-tourism as responsible travel to natural areas that conserves the environment and improves the well-being of local people.

Eco-tour operators make a genuine effot to teach responsible travel practices that honor and support the local flora and fauna, terrain, culture and economy.
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Eco-travel focuses first and foremost on learning. Supporting local communities is also a significant priority. this is a positive step for our collective footprint on the planet, and for relashionships between the first and third worlds.

The traveler may actually contribute to the environment, culture, or economy of the area. For example, eco-travelers may devote a holiday to supporting research in remote locations, or helping Kamchatka brown bear.
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Eco-tours reinvest in the areas they visit, ranging from supporting the local population in their animal conservation measures to investing in independent, local projects such a s schools, hospitals, and small-scale co-ops.

Kamchatka boasts diverse and abundant wildlife. This is due to climates ranging from temperate to subarctic, diverse topography and geography, many free-flowing rivers, proximity to highly productive waters from the northwestern Pacific Ocean and the Bering and Okhotsk Seas, and to the low human density and minimal development. It also boasts the southernmost expanse of Arctic tundra in the world. Commercial exploitation of marine resources and a history of fur trapping has taken its toll on several species.
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Kamchatka is famous for the abundance and size of its brown bears. In the Kronotsky Nature Preserve there are estimated to be three to four bears per 100 square kilometres.[12] Other fauna of note include carnivores such as wolf, arctic and other fox, lynx, wolverine, sable, several species of weasel, ermine and river otter; several large ungulates, such as bighorn sheep, reindeer, and moose; and rodents/leporids, including hares, marmot, lemming and several species of squirrel. The peninsula is the breeding ground for Steller’s sea eagle,[13] one of the largest eagle species, along with the golden eagle and gyr falcon.
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Kamchatka contains probably the world’s greatest diversity of salmonid fish, including all six species of anadromous Pacific salmon (chinook, chum, coho, seema, pink, and sockeye). Due to its uniquely suitable environment, biologists estimate that a fifth of all Pacific salmon originates in Kamchatka. Kuril Lake is recognized as the biggest spawning-ground for sockey in Eurasia. In response to pressure from poaching and to worldwide decreases in salmon stocks, some 24,000 square kilometres (9,300 sq mi) along nine of the more productive salmon rivers are in the process of being set aside as a nature preserve. Stickleback species, particularly Gasterosteus aculeatus and Pungitius pungitius, also occur in many coastal drainages, and are likely present in freshwater as well.
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Seabirds include northern fulmars, thick and thin-billed murres, kittiwakes, tufted and horned puffins, red-faced, pelagic and other cormorants, and many other species. Typical of the northern seas, the marine fauna is likewise rich. Of commercial importance are Kamchatka crab (king crab), scallop, squid, pollock, cod, herring, halibut and several species of flatfish.
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Kamchatka was discovered by Russian Cossacks over 3 hundred years ago. However, even today Russians know very little about it, to say nothing about the rest of the world where most people have hardly heard of Kamchatka.This century the airplanes have made Kamchatka closer to Europe and America though not more available.
The Valley of Geysers is the only geyser field in Eurasia (apart from the Mutnovsky geyser field) and the second largest concentration of geysers in the world. This 6 km long basin with approximately ninety geysers and many hot springs is situated on the Kamchatka Peninsula in the Russian Far East, predominantly on the left bank of the ever-deepening Geysernaya River, into which geothermal waters flow from a relatively young strato-volcano, Kikhpinych. It is part of the Kronotsky Nature Reserve, which, in turn, is incorporated into the World Heritage Site “Volcanoes of Kamchatka”.

Kamchatka is probably the only place where the saying “Bears walk on the streets of Russia” is true…
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